Anthony Gismondi: B.C. wine of the week, wine to cellar and calendar items

Vancouver Sun wine expert Anthony Gismondi's news from the wine and food world, recommended B.C. wine of the week, and a wine to add to your cellar.

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Christian Miller, proprietor of Full Glass Research, which analyzes industry trends spoke with Kathleen Wilcox from Wine-Searcher.com had some interesting things to say about sustainable wine.

“We have been studying sustainability for more than a decade. The closer something is to being put in your mouth raw, the closer it must hew to being organic to be perceived as sustainable. In an extreme case, let’s take an apple vs. floor cleaner. Consumers will want the apple to be organic but may accept floor cleaner as sustainable if it’s produced in an energy-efficient way or its packaging is ecologically minded. Wine is a processed item in the middle ground between these extremes, alongside breakfast cereal or jam.”

In other words, sustainability initiatives for wineries can certainly include organic and biodynamic initiatives but could also include, say, greener packaging or solar-powered production lines.

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7-Eleven’s announcement to seek licences for its store to sell wine and beer in several of its Ontario stores points to how ill-prepared and the ill-advised government is when it comes to the business of retail.

Restaurants, grocery stores, fast food outlets, big box stores and private liquor stores and liquor distributors are all swimming in the same pool, and they all want the same deal government gives itself to sell liquor. What was already a mess is getting messier, and it won’t be long before Ontario looks like B.C. — or it could consider the Alberta model and get out of retail permanently and leave that business to the business world, but that would likely make too much sense.


B.C. wine of the week

Summerhill Pyramid Winery Summerhill Vineyard Pinot Noir Demeter Certified Biodynamic 2018, Okanagan Valley, British Columbia, Canada

$35.00 I 88/100

UPC: 779000128396

The first certified biodynamic Pinot Noir in the province was fermented in 10,000-litre foudres and pressed off into a stainless steel tank. It was bottled as young as possible in early March, and it is delicious. The vibrancy and freshness of the wine serve it well. The attack is juicy, and the bright, sour cherry enamours before the earthy forest floor notes keep it all in balance.  It is quite startling in texture and weight. It tastes “natural.” There is no yeast added, no intervention, and well, not much but Pinot Noir fruit from the home vineyard — an impressive start. Kudos to the team.

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Wine for the cellar

Tedeschi Amarone della Valpolicella 2013, Pedemonte Valpolicella, Veneto, Italy

$57.99 I 92/100

UPC: 8019171000070

A modern, stylish Amarone with power and finesse with a rich floral blackcurrant nose flecked with licorice and tar before a bright beam of acidity settles in. Perfectly balanced, it finishes with plenty of tannins to suggest a minimum two-decade life ahead. Made from grapes harvested across several sites across Valpolicella, this is a blend of Corvina, Corvinone, Rondinella, Rossignola, Oceleta, Negara and Dindarella, averaging 20+ years. The grapes are racked and dried for four months before a gentle press, a two-month ferment, a three-year stay in Slavonian oak, and a six-month stint in the bottle after blending and bottling — patience will reward.

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